Tag Archives: liv tyler

“The Leftovers” 2.09 or White Lines or Let The Mystery Be

Leftover 2x09 Meg

Sunday night’s episode of The Leftovers, “Ten Thirteen”, was brought to you by the letter M. M is for Matters. As in, does it?

Good God that finale. Good God, Meg! We will get to all that, but first I must point out how exceptionally telling the music was in this episode. The soundtrack was so deliberate it seemed to be guiding us somewhere. As Olivia Newton-John sang towards the end of the episode “Come take my hand / You should know me / I’ve always been in your mind / You know that I’ll be kind / I’ll be guiding you.” Really though, that was a reference to Meg’s leadership throughout the episode. Revealing (reminding) what was always on your (Evie/Jarden’s) mind, but far from kind.

Last week’s idea of an evil in the water (rather than the supposedly blessed Jarden water) is echoed early on, as well, when a bus full of tourists sing the Negro spiritual warning: “Wade in the water / God’s going to trouble the water.”

Then we have Grandmaster Flash’s 80’s classic “White Lines” played at the opening, middle, and closing of the episode. This song is also a warning, this time against the destructive consequences of cocaine (“Vision dreams of passion blowin’ through my mind / And all the while I think of you / (High price) A very strange reaction / (For us to unwind) The more I see, the more I do of.”) but the meaning goes beyond Meg’s addiction. One cannot ignore the militant white lines of white-robed Remnant followers forming behind Meg towards a literally destructive and violent resolution.

Finally, there is a country cover of When in Rome’s “The Promise” as Meg and Tommy dance at the Honky Tonk (“But if you wait around a while I’ll make you fall for me / I promise, I promise you, I will / When your day is through / And so is your temper / You know what to do / I’m gonna always be there”). Poor, poor, Tommy.

Just a little something to think about in this episode as well as past/future episodes of “The Leftovers” where music has frequently served as a foreshadowing if not a warning.

And now for the good stuff.

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: